Top 10 Disgusting Seafood Delicacies

Top-10-disgusting-seafood-dishes-from-around-the-world

Tired of the hum-drum, boring selection of foods available at your local grocery store or restaurant? Think maybe a mouthful of decaying flesh, urine-scented jelly or still-squirming critters are more to your taste (literally)? In that case, take a glance at this list of truly disgusting seafood delicacies. Warning: unless you regularly dine like a Disney villain, it may spoil your appetite.

10. Lutefisk

lutefisk

Those Nordic folks are renowned for their beauty, but it surely didn’t come as a result from the lutefisk they love to eat. What is lutefisk exactly?lutefisk2 It is whitefish soaked in lye until it loses its consistency and more closely resembles Jello (albeit a gray, urine-scented Jello). After it is prepared, the fish can be cooked in all the ways a normal, fresh fish can, as long as the chef takes care to not cook it too long (or it would melt away). Perhaps unsurprisingly, it is common to pair lutefisk with a strong beer. You will probably need it before the first bite.

9. Muktuk

muktuk

Now almost everyone has had a battle with fatty foods, at one point in their lives. But some people just aren’t fighting anymore: in fact, they not only eat fat, they eat it nice and raw. Muktuk is a seafood dish that consists of two main ingredients: a whale’s skin and blubber. Often, it’s served up nice and raw for fans of the dish, but you can do almost anything else with it, including boiling, frying and pickling. At least this unpleasant delicacy has a benefit: it is known to contain a significant amount of Vitamin C. That’s enough of a benefit to make up for the gore. Well… almost.

8. Kiviak

kiviak

Nothing says Christmas like a fruitcake, some pudding and the decaying mush that is kiviak. kiviak2You can work up quite an appetite when preparing this delicacy. See, first you have to capture and kill a bunch of auks (small birds that some people mistake as miniature penguins); then, you have to take one dead seal and scrape out all of its insides. Finally, you have to stuff the birds (yes, the whole bird) into the emptied-out seal, squish out any remaining air, and then use a big heavy rock to close up the skin while you wait for the insides to become a big, sloppy, mushy mess. Believe it or not, this is served up at formal events in Greenland.

7. Tuna Eyes

tuna-eyeballs

You’ve heard the saying, watch what you eat. But what if what you’re eating is watching you? That’s possible when you are dining on this seafood delight: tuna eyes. It’s a little hard to pinpoint the exact appeal of this dish. Is it the jelly-like consistency of the eyeballs before you cook them or the egg-like consistency when they come out of the pot? Is it the pleasure of cutting and tearing away the stringy muscles and left-over clumps of flesh from the surrounding areas? Maybe, just maybe, it’s the easy slide of your fork through the eye balls as you prepare to bring a bite between your lips. Whatever the answer, it’s clearly an acquired taste.

6. Hakarl

hakarl

You know you’re in trouble when your seafood platter comes with the warning to plug your nose, and that’s exactly the standard advice for newcomers to hakarl. hakarl2Hakarl is basically decaying shark. Before it is prepared, the Iceland shark’s flesh contains a copious amount of ammonia, making it unfit for human consumption. Undeterred, HARDY Icelanders have found a way to make it more edible: allow it to rot for several months. Unpleasant but true: after it’s fermented for nearly half a year, this dish is ready to eat. The strong ammonia smell remains, however, hence the wisdom in plugging up before gulping down.

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